The latest from the CSCenter
CSC is now PCSC

Conflict Study Center (CSC) is now Peace and Conflict Studies Center (PCSC), as originally conceived and planned, for all purposes. This reflects the fact that Nepal and Nepali people's primary focus now has shifted from conflict to peace. PCSC believes that all its attention and activities need to be concentrated on peace and helping to make it sustained. Providing quality training to highly capable Nepalis to become dedicated peace professionals will be part of PCSC's support to the peace process. At the same time, however, PCSC will continue its activities concerning conflict and violence minimization and research and information dissemination on peace and conflict. PCSC welcomes any and all ideas and suggestions as to how it might be better able to contribute to the country's strenuous journey to peace.

 

Women and DDR in the World

Situation Update 103                                                        

September 13, 2011
Women and DDR in the World
Bishnu Pathak, PhD*

The paper provides an overview of the Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration (DDR) practices existing in the world. It researches when and for what purposes the United Nations initiate DDR programs in post-conflict countries. It examines the scale and consequences of the various roles of ex-combatants, particularly the women ex-combatants in a transitional society. It aims to compare and explore some of the best and worst practices of DDR and militarized masculinity before, during, and after the violence. Secondary literatures mostly draw on to learn from yesterday, analyze to live for today, and encourage to hope for tomorrow
 

 
Women and DDR in the World
 

Approaches to Citizen-Centric Policing

 

Situation Update 102

June 13, 2011

Bishnu Pathak, PhD

 

Citizen-Centric Policing (CCP) or Neighborhood Policing (NP) is radar of Community Policing (CP).  The CP is a policing practice that aims to increase interaction between citizens and police officials for public safety and quality of life in the community (Wycoff: 1994).  It is more than tactics, strategy, and technique (Trojanowicz: 1998).  It has become the national mantra to spring up in urban, suburban, and even rural police departments (Greene: 2000) or police stations.  The CP promises to change relationships progressively to improve the living conditions of neighborhoods (Eck and Rosenbaum: 1994).  It is a panacea for crime (Friedmann: 1996) or reducing crime in the community.

The US agenda of crime control includes a visible place for CP and its derivatives (Skolnick and Bayley: 1988) overcoming resistance of subculture of the police (Skolnick: 1966) on endangerment, authority, and efficiency.  It is a shifting of departments toward community and problem-oriented policing from traditional practices (Goldstein: 1990).  The CP fully complies with human rights standards, integrating law enforcement philosophy, and transforming self-centered to service-centered (community-centered) behavioral practices of the police.

 

 

 
Approaches to Citizen-Centric Policing
 

Insecurity in Security

Situation Update 101

May 13, 2011

Bishnu Pathak, PhD

 

The burgeoning Chinese, In¬dian and Pakistani influence raises alarm in transitional Nepal which has an open border with both China and India. India encircles it from three sides east, west and south with a 1,751 km long largely porous border, unmarked and unguarded, whereas China lies to the north with 1,414 km of inac¬cessible border. It is not possible to cross this border owing to elevation of snowy mountains and tight secu¬rity on the Chinese side. The recent Nepal(Nepo)-India cross border opening has been an ideal conduit for al¬leged spies. Nepal has also been a favorable terrain for smuggling il¬legal goods, arms and ammunition, counterfeit currency notes, Free Ti¬bet literature, etc. Nepal, India and China have been close neighbors for a long time indeed.

 
Insecurity in Security
 

UNMIN’s Humiliating Withdrawal

Situation Update 100

March 21, 2011

Bishnu Pathak, PhD

 

The United Nations Mission in Nepal (UNMIN) was in¬vited after a series of formal and informal agreements and under¬standings signed by both parties, the CPN (Maoist) and the then Government of Nepal (GoN) to accomplish the peace process. On August 9, 2006, the Mao¬ists and the GoN sent a 5-point joint letter to the UN Secretary General to establish the UNMIN with provisions to continue human rights monitoring. The letter asked to assist in the moni¬toring of the truce, managing arms and armed personnel on both sides - the Maoist Army (MA) and the Nepal Army (NA) - deploying qualified ci¬vilian personnel. It also requested for technical support and observation of elections to the Constituent Assembly to be held in April 2008.
1.    Functions
The Agreement on Monitoring of the Management of Arms and Armies or AMMAA (December 8, 2006) formally invited UN to (i) guarantee the fundamental rights of the Nepali people to take part in the CA in a free and fair environment without fear; (ii) to ensure sovereignty for the Nepali people in the form of a progressive political outlet, a democratically  restructured  state, and social-economic-cultural transformation; and (iii) to fully observe the terms of the bilateral agreement witnessed by the United Nations; and (iv) to seek UN assistance in monitoring the management of the arms and armies of both sides.
 

 
UNMIN’s Humiliating Withdrawal
 
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Who we are

Founded in 2006, The Conflict Study Center is comprised of a group of preeminent experts and scholars in related fields united with the vision of a peaceful and fully democratic, inclusive Nepal that upholds the rule of law and respects human rights.

It is committed to the process of conflict transformation through peaceful means, a concept that stands apart from others such as conflict resolution and conflict management in that it seeks to mitigate the underlying causes of conflict by transforming the societal relationships that support violence.

 

Projects

Police Station Visitors’ Week 2011

The Police Station Visitors’ Week (PSVW) 2011 was organized by the ALTUS Global Alliance from October 31 to November 6, 2011. It was a global initiative organized in 21 countries, namely Benin, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Uganda in Africa; Bangladesh, India, Maldives, Nepal, and Pakistan in Asia; Latvia and Russia in Europe; Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Peru in Latin America; and USA in North America. It covered all the continents stretching from Bangladesh to Brazil, Maldives to Mexico, and Russia to Benin. Altus is a global alliance working across continents with a multicultural perspective to improve public safety and justice. Peace and Conflict Studies Center (PCSC) is one among the local partner organizations of Altus Global Alliance to conduct the PSVW event in Nepal, which was held two times earlier in 2009 and 2010. The event incorporates ten police stations in Kathmandu Valley situated at Balaju, Bouddha, Bhaktapur, Gaushala, Hanumandhoka, Kalimati, Lalitpur, Maharajgung, New Baneswor, and Singhadurbar. During the event, small groups of citizens visit the local police stations to produce comparable scores on five dimensions, namely Community Orientation, Physical Conditions, Equal Treatment (of public without bias based on age, gender, ethnicity, nationality, minority, status, or sexual orientation), Transparency and Accountability, and Detention Conditions. Thus, the police stations are expected to improve their quality of services provided to the civilians in comparison to previous years and to strengthen transparency and accountability of police toward local citizens whom they are supposed to serve, thus promoting their humanitarian standards as well.

For more, please read the following reports:


Police Station Visitors Week 2010 

Between October 18th to 24th 2010, Altus had organized Police Station Visitors’ Week (PSVW) in 21 countries, namely Benin, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Uganda in Africa; Bangladesh, India, Maldives, Nepal, and Pakistan in Asia; Latvia and Russia in Europe; Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Peru in Latin America; and USA in North America. It tried to cover all the continents stretching from Bangladesh to Brazil, Maldives to Mexico, and Russia to Benin.

Peace and Conflict Studies Center (PCSC), one of the local partner organizations of the Altus Global Alliance for PSVW, had organized the event for the second time in Nepal. The event incorporated ten police stations in Kathmandu Valley situated at Balaju, Bouddha, Bhaktapur, Gaushala, Hanumandhoka, Kalimati, Lalitpur, Maharajgung, New Baneswor, and Singhadurbar.

 In the PSVW event, the visitors observed and assessed through five dimensional objectives, namely Community Orientation, Physical Conditions, Equal Treatment of the Public, Transparency and Accountability, and Detention Conditions. The event was aimed to assess the quality of services delivered in police stations by identifying some of the best practices being used by the police in order to strengthen their accountability toward the local citizens by ensuring national, regional, and international human rights standards.

For more, please read the following reports:

Ctizen-Centric Policing

National Report 

Regional Report 

Global Report 

 

Police Station Visitors Week 2009

Police Station Visitors’ Week (PSVW) was organized from October 26th to November 1st, 2009 by the ALTUS Global Alliance (www.altus.org). In the PSVW event, small teams of residents visited their local police stations in 20 countries to assess certain aspects of the services that they provide to the public.

The Conflict Study Center (CS Center), one of the local partner organizations of the Altus Global Alliance for PSVW, had organized the event for the first time in Nepal, which incorporated ten police stations in Kathmandu Valley situated at Balaju, Bouddha, Bhaktapur, Gaushala, Hanumandhoka, Kalimati, Lalitpur, Maharajgung, New Baneswor, and Singhadurbar.

 

 

 

 

 

National Report

Regional Report

Global Report