The latest from the CSCenter
CSC is now PCSC

Conflict Study Center (CSC) is now Peace and Conflict Studies Center (PCSC), as originally conceived and planned, for all purposes. This reflects the fact that Nepal and Nepali people's primary focus now has shifted from conflict to peace. PCSC believes that all its attention and activities need to be concentrated on peace and helping to make it sustained. Providing quality training to highly capable Nepalis to become dedicated peace professionals will be part of PCSC's support to the peace process. At the same time, however, PCSC will continue its activities concerning conflict and violence minimization and research and information dissemination on peace and conflict. PCSC welcomes any and all ideas and suggestions as to how it might be better able to contribute to the country's strenuous journey to peace.

 

Lessons Learned from Nepal’s People’s Victory 2006

Situation Update 99

March 7, 2011

Bishnu Pathak, PhD


After successfully ousting Tunisian and Egyptian tyrannical regimes, the oppressed masses have taken to the streets of numerous cities in the Arab World with the hope that change for freedom is possible. The Arab world has a long history of frozen conflicts, but from the gravity of events in the first quarter of 2011, it has already been a year of people’s uprising. The North Africa and Middle East civil resistance marks an unprecedented revolutionary wave. Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and so forth have been centers of historical consequence for the revolutions. The civilian unrest campaigns of strikes, marches, rallies, captures and demonstrations. Tunisia’s Mohamed Bouazizi’s self-immolation has been an ignition of Jasmine Revolution.
The unemployed, frustrated and alienated youths initially mobilized the youth movement over the internet, simply called “cyber warfare”. Through this fast medium of collaboration, masses organized to liberate the people from unjust regimes, first on the streets of Tunisia. The authoritarian regimes used their old structured strategies of theocracy and imposed or further tightened the state of emergency in an attempt to continuously hold on to power. Professionals from various walks of life joined the protests for different reasons and voicing grievances of identity (religion, region, class, ethnicities, etc.), resources (narrow down the gap between rich and poor; stop widespread unemployment, rampant official and non-official corruptions and inflation); democratization (inclusive participation); sovereignty and respect (protection and promotion of fundamental human rights and freedoms). The “Sturm und Drang” is spreading extensively in the Arab World which has been pursing authoritarian regimes since the Third Wave democracy in 1974.
 

 
Lessons Learned from Nepal’s People’s Victory 2006
 

UNMIN’s Withdrawal Formally Winds up Maoist Army Cantonment and Barracking of the Nepal Army

Situation Update 98

December 22 , 2010

Bishnu Pathak, PhD



The Sanskrit adage Buvukshitah kim na karoti papam? (What vice is unthinkable to an empty stomach?) occurred in mind when we (including Freelance Journalist Jibanath Khanal) were deliberating upon the “U-turn ” of Nepal’s peace process, wondering whether the successor of UNMIN could take over the monitoring and supervision of the arms and armies. While a full-stomach seeks freedom first, an empty stomach looks for food above all temptations. It is curious to note that despite endemic poverty in Nepal, none of the past understandings, agreements or peace accords signed between Seven Party Alliance (SPA)-led Government and the Maoists advocates for food, each of them goes first for freedom. The extension and withdrawal of UNMIN, the two opposite voices that have become public are, in fact, rooted in this same issue: food and freedom, which are the two wheels of a cart. Extremist thoughts can only impede the peace process, (re)integration and rehabilitation of the Maoist Army (MA) and drafting of a new constitution. Here, the study tries to focus on the integration and rehabilitation of the Maoist Army after the withdrawal of the UNMIN rather than considering the food vs. freedom agenda.

 

 
UNMIN’s Withdrawal Formally Winds up Maoist Army Cantonment and Barracking of the Nepal Army
 

Peacebuilding Approaches in Nepal

Situation Update 97

November 10, 2010

Bishnu Pathak, PhD

 

Conflict occurs in the world as a result of the emergence of identity and class-based (ICB) politics rooted in basic socioeconomic and human needs, values and interests, in conjunction with population bulge theory. During the Cold War, the world was largely divided into two opposing camps, capitalism and communism. Johan Galtung, the father of peace studies, has stated that nationalisms, ethnicities and religious identities in the post-Cold War era have led Western intellectuals to reconsider the role of these factors in the developing world order (Galtung 2008a: 10). There has been a shift from the previous two-pillar power equation to a unipolar world, with the politico-ideological divisions between communism and capitalism being replaced by ICB dimensions (the widening gap between rich and poor; cultural; personal; relational; and structural). These contemporary conflicts are complex, with deep-rooted causes. Conflict arises from differences and contradictions in attitudes and behaviour (Galtung 2000: 14).

 
Peacebuilding Approaches in Nepal
 

Nepali Diaspora in Australia and NRN

Situation Update 96
September 04, 2010

Bishnu Pathak, PhD

 

Om Bhur Bhuvaha Svaha Om Tat Savithur Varenyam; Bhargo Dhevasya Dheemahi; Dhiyo Yo Naha Prachodayat…  (The word that is God the almighty; God who is eternal, embodiment of vital or spiritual energy; God who is the creator, destroyer of suffering; God who is independent, embodiment of happiness, that eternal God; That creative principle of light manifested through Sun; That Supreme God propagated by the highest Gods; That light that bestows wisdom, bliss and everlasting life; The light of that effulgent God; we mediate; May our intellect; Be directed by that lord, towards illumination….)” .

The above mentioned short invocation of the Gayathri Manthr  is a common spirit of all Nepali living in Australia, particularly Nepali residing in Grandville.  This Mantra was playing at the Pujakotha, (worship room) of Mr. Goba Katuwal on Saturday July 10, 2010 at 8.15 hours while I arrived.  On the door of the Pujakotha, a computer typed Matters not to be Forgotten by the Humans, (Nepali) collected by his wife, (Ms. Bishnu Katuwal) has been pasted in front of the living room, (See box 1). I went there respecting their invitation for breakfast from the neighborhood house of Mr. Bharat Pant and Ms. Shanta Pant, (Sangroulla).  Ms. Shanta has also decorated the Pujakotha with the photographs of Shiva, Bishnu, Devi, etc at the ground floor of her house.  Nepali, most of the time, speak Nepali and eat the traditional Nepali food such as; dal, bhat, tarkari and achar for the evening meal.

 
Nepali Diaspora in Australia and NRN
 
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Who we are

Founded in 2006, The Conflict Study Center is comprised of a group of preeminent experts and scholars in related fields united with the vision of a peaceful and fully democratic, inclusive Nepal that upholds the rule of law and respects human rights.

It is committed to the process of conflict transformation through peaceful means, a concept that stands apart from others such as conflict resolution and conflict management in that it seeks to mitigate the underlying causes of conflict by transforming the societal relationships that support violence.

 

Projects

Police Station Visitors’ Week 2011

The Police Station Visitors’ Week (PSVW) 2011 was organized by the ALTUS Global Alliance from October 31 to November 6, 2011. It was a global initiative organized in 21 countries, namely Benin, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Uganda in Africa; Bangladesh, India, Maldives, Nepal, and Pakistan in Asia; Latvia and Russia in Europe; Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Peru in Latin America; and USA in North America. It covered all the continents stretching from Bangladesh to Brazil, Maldives to Mexico, and Russia to Benin. Altus is a global alliance working across continents with a multicultural perspective to improve public safety and justice. Peace and Conflict Studies Center (PCSC) is one among the local partner organizations of Altus Global Alliance to conduct the PSVW event in Nepal, which was held two times earlier in 2009 and 2010. The event incorporates ten police stations in Kathmandu Valley situated at Balaju, Bouddha, Bhaktapur, Gaushala, Hanumandhoka, Kalimati, Lalitpur, Maharajgung, New Baneswor, and Singhadurbar. During the event, small groups of citizens visit the local police stations to produce comparable scores on five dimensions, namely Community Orientation, Physical Conditions, Equal Treatment (of public without bias based on age, gender, ethnicity, nationality, minority, status, or sexual orientation), Transparency and Accountability, and Detention Conditions. Thus, the police stations are expected to improve their quality of services provided to the civilians in comparison to previous years and to strengthen transparency and accountability of police toward local citizens whom they are supposed to serve, thus promoting their humanitarian standards as well.

For more, please read the following reports:


Police Station Visitors Week 2010 

Between October 18th to 24th 2010, Altus had organized Police Station Visitors’ Week (PSVW) in 21 countries, namely Benin, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Uganda in Africa; Bangladesh, India, Maldives, Nepal, and Pakistan in Asia; Latvia and Russia in Europe; Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Peru in Latin America; and USA in North America. It tried to cover all the continents stretching from Bangladesh to Brazil, Maldives to Mexico, and Russia to Benin.

Peace and Conflict Studies Center (PCSC), one of the local partner organizations of the Altus Global Alliance for PSVW, had organized the event for the second time in Nepal. The event incorporated ten police stations in Kathmandu Valley situated at Balaju, Bouddha, Bhaktapur, Gaushala, Hanumandhoka, Kalimati, Lalitpur, Maharajgung, New Baneswor, and Singhadurbar.

 In the PSVW event, the visitors observed and assessed through five dimensional objectives, namely Community Orientation, Physical Conditions, Equal Treatment of the Public, Transparency and Accountability, and Detention Conditions. The event was aimed to assess the quality of services delivered in police stations by identifying some of the best practices being used by the police in order to strengthen their accountability toward the local citizens by ensuring national, regional, and international human rights standards.

For more, please read the following reports:

Ctizen-Centric Policing

National Report 

Regional Report 

Global Report 

 

Police Station Visitors Week 2009

Police Station Visitors’ Week (PSVW) was organized from October 26th to November 1st, 2009 by the ALTUS Global Alliance (www.altus.org). In the PSVW event, small teams of residents visited their local police stations in 20 countries to assess certain aspects of the services that they provide to the public.

The Conflict Study Center (CS Center), one of the local partner organizations of the Altus Global Alliance for PSVW, had organized the event for the first time in Nepal, which incorporated ten police stations in Kathmandu Valley situated at Balaju, Bouddha, Bhaktapur, Gaushala, Hanumandhoka, Kalimati, Lalitpur, Maharajgung, New Baneswor, and Singhadurbar.

 

 

 

 

 

National Report

Regional Report

Global Report