The latest from the CSCenter
CSC is now PCSC

Conflict Study Center (CSC) is now Peace and Conflict Studies Center (PCSC), as originally conceived and planned, for all purposes. This reflects the fact that Nepal and Nepali people's primary focus now has shifted from conflict to peace. PCSC believes that all its attention and activities need to be concentrated on peace and helping to make it sustained. Providing quality training to highly capable Nepalis to become dedicated peace professionals will be part of PCSC's support to the peace process. At the same time, however, PCSC will continue its activities concerning conflict and violence minimization and research and information dissemination on peace and conflict. PCSC welcomes any and all ideas and suggestions as to how it might be better able to contribute to the country's strenuous journey to peace.

 

Political Violence: General Overview in Nepalese Context

Situation Update 95

June 16, 2010
Devendra Uprety


Political violence is characterized by both direct and structural violence used by a state, political party, ethnic or regional group to achieve its objectives. It is conceptualized by Moser and Clark (2001) very succinctly as the collective sphere manifested in “guerrilla conflict, para-military conflict, political assassinations, armed conflict between political parties, rape and sexual abuse as a political act and forced pregnancy/sterilization. It is a collective effort to impose or resist power and it is driven by intention or the will to power of a specific group, class, religion, gender, etc.

 

 
Political Violence: General Overview in Nepalese Context
 

Assessing Maoists Janaandolan III in Theory: An Assessment of Transforming Military Culture in to a Semi-Military Nonviolence Movement

Situation Update 94

May 27, 2010

Bishnu Pathak, PhD

 

Puspa Kamal Dahal alias Prachanda, Chairperson of the United Communist Party of Nepal or UCPN (Maoist), has time and again said that the party he represents is being isolated.  Grave connotations can be drawn from this juncture of peace and epoch of constitutional writing.  The Maoists with 239 (39.77%) seats, largest party in the Constituent Assembly (CA) are nowhere in the government structure and the coalition partners talk tirelessly over consensus politics.  The Nepali Congress (NC) has occupied the two positions of first republic president and chairperson of the Constitution Drafting Committee (CDC).  The UML belongs to Prime Minister (PM) and Chairperson to the CA.  The vice president is from Madhesi Janaadhikar Forum.  There is no Maoist eye in the international community due to the lack of their own foreign ambassadors.  The bureaucracy has rampantly been controlled by the NC and UML. 

 
Assessing Maoists Janaandolan III in Theory: An Assessment of Transforming Military Culture in to a Semi-Military Nonviolence Movement
 

Nepal’s Peace Process towards Ambiguity

Situation Update 93

May 7, 2010

Bishnu Pathak, PhD

 

At 2.20 PM on May 1, 2010 at the western gate of the Khula Manch (Martyr Theater), an aged, thin-and-weak man of about 35 fainted. The volunteers of the United Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) made a human chain of 10 meters in circumference around the huge crowd. A few of them tried to cool him down by fanning their caps and papers and throwing their drinking water over him. Both of his legs were buckled from the intense heat, while camera men were eager to snap images/bod. The crowd members were seeking first aiders to treat him. Two minutes later, he stood up with the help of a man. His face and lips were dried. A woman aiding him grasped his right hand and disappeared with him through the sea of humans .

While the above is but one example of a casualty in a protest environment, it is important to note that there are large numbers of youths and women which participate in anti-government protests in Kathmandu. Besides the local participation, hundreds of demonstrators are coming or are brought in to Kathmandu to participate in the rallies and the indefinite general strike.

 
Nepal’s Peace Process towards Ambiguity
 

A Darkening Scenario in Nepal

Situation Update 92

April 21, 2010

Bishnu Pathak, PhD
 

Nepal may again find itself in the middle of a deep national crisis if a new Constitution is not announced by the stipulated date. The Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal is rich in terms of cultural heritage with various ethnic, tribal, and social groups. Situated in the Himalayas, Nepal adjoins the Tibet Autonomous Region of China in the north and India in the south. Nepalese are the descendants of Tibeto-Burman migrants from the north and Indo-Aryans from the south. Census 2001 listed 103 caste/ethnic groups with 92 different living languages. There are three major linguistic groups - Indo-Aryan, Tibeto-Burman and indigenous. The first meeting of the Constituent Assembly in early 2008 formally ended the world's only Hindu kingdom and henceforth it became a secular nation with a population mix of 80.6% Hindus, 11% Buddhists and 4.2% Muslims.

The drafting of a new constitution by the Constituent Assembly (CA) had been much awaited since 1950. B P Koirala, the founder of Nepali Congress (NC), was an advocate of CA, until his death. The CPN (UML), demanded for a CA, but was wrecked with the conspiratorial death of Madan Bhandari. The UCPN (Maoist) finally succeeded to endorse the CA through the means of the People’s War.

 
A Darkening Scenario in Nepal
 
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Who we are

Founded in 2006, The Conflict Study Center is comprised of a group of preeminent experts and scholars in related fields united with the vision of a peaceful and fully democratic, inclusive Nepal that upholds the rule of law and respects human rights.

It is committed to the process of conflict transformation through peaceful means, a concept that stands apart from others such as conflict resolution and conflict management in that it seeks to mitigate the underlying causes of conflict by transforming the societal relationships that support violence.

 

Projects

Police Station Visitors’ Week 2011

The Police Station Visitors’ Week (PSVW) 2011 was organized by the ALTUS Global Alliance from October 31 to November 6, 2011. It was a global initiative organized in 21 countries, namely Benin, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Uganda in Africa; Bangladesh, India, Maldives, Nepal, and Pakistan in Asia; Latvia and Russia in Europe; Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Peru in Latin America; and USA in North America. It covered all the continents stretching from Bangladesh to Brazil, Maldives to Mexico, and Russia to Benin. Altus is a global alliance working across continents with a multicultural perspective to improve public safety and justice. Peace and Conflict Studies Center (PCSC) is one among the local partner organizations of Altus Global Alliance to conduct the PSVW event in Nepal, which was held two times earlier in 2009 and 2010. The event incorporates ten police stations in Kathmandu Valley situated at Balaju, Bouddha, Bhaktapur, Gaushala, Hanumandhoka, Kalimati, Lalitpur, Maharajgung, New Baneswor, and Singhadurbar. During the event, small groups of citizens visit the local police stations to produce comparable scores on five dimensions, namely Community Orientation, Physical Conditions, Equal Treatment (of public without bias based on age, gender, ethnicity, nationality, minority, status, or sexual orientation), Transparency and Accountability, and Detention Conditions. Thus, the police stations are expected to improve their quality of services provided to the civilians in comparison to previous years and to strengthen transparency and accountability of police toward local citizens whom they are supposed to serve, thus promoting their humanitarian standards as well.

For more, please read the following reports:


Police Station Visitors Week 2010 

Between October 18th to 24th 2010, Altus had organized Police Station Visitors’ Week (PSVW) in 21 countries, namely Benin, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Uganda in Africa; Bangladesh, India, Maldives, Nepal, and Pakistan in Asia; Latvia and Russia in Europe; Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Peru in Latin America; and USA in North America. It tried to cover all the continents stretching from Bangladesh to Brazil, Maldives to Mexico, and Russia to Benin.

Peace and Conflict Studies Center (PCSC), one of the local partner organizations of the Altus Global Alliance for PSVW, had organized the event for the second time in Nepal. The event incorporated ten police stations in Kathmandu Valley situated at Balaju, Bouddha, Bhaktapur, Gaushala, Hanumandhoka, Kalimati, Lalitpur, Maharajgung, New Baneswor, and Singhadurbar.

 In the PSVW event, the visitors observed and assessed through five dimensional objectives, namely Community Orientation, Physical Conditions, Equal Treatment of the Public, Transparency and Accountability, and Detention Conditions. The event was aimed to assess the quality of services delivered in police stations by identifying some of the best practices being used by the police in order to strengthen their accountability toward the local citizens by ensuring national, regional, and international human rights standards.

For more, please read the following reports:

Ctizen-Centric Policing

National Report 

Regional Report 

Global Report 

 

Police Station Visitors Week 2009

Police Station Visitors’ Week (PSVW) was organized from October 26th to November 1st, 2009 by the ALTUS Global Alliance (www.altus.org). In the PSVW event, small teams of residents visited their local police stations in 20 countries to assess certain aspects of the services that they provide to the public.

The Conflict Study Center (CS Center), one of the local partner organizations of the Altus Global Alliance for PSVW, had organized the event for the first time in Nepal, which incorporated ten police stations in Kathmandu Valley situated at Balaju, Bouddha, Bhaktapur, Gaushala, Hanumandhoka, Kalimati, Lalitpur, Maharajgung, New Baneswor, and Singhadurbar.

 

 

 

 

 

National Report

Regional Report

Global Report